Host a Honey Tasting

It is possible to purchase a whole honeycomb or a piece of one. Show your children and guests how the bees store their honey!

Introduction

It is possible to purchase a whole honeycomb or a piece of one. Show your children and guests how the bees store their honey. Let them dip a spoon directly into the honeycomb and taste the raw honey directly from it, wax and all!

Serve honey made from the nectar of different types of flowers. Taste different varieties of honey, from dark to light. Pick or purchase the flowers to show where the nectar came from.

Get creative with recycling by washing empty glass jars or bottles you may have around the house. Otherwise, you can purchase some small glass jars in bulk. Buy a large container of honey to transfer to your smaller jars.

Ingredients

  • Clean clear glass jars with lids

  • Honey dippers

  • Funnel

  • Squares of fabrics such as gingham, burlap, lace, or cotton.

  • Paper

  • Hole puncher

  • Markers

  • Ribbon 

Preparation

Important Note: serve the honeycomb and honey indoors. If you serve it outside, it will attract bees and other insects, who will want to eat it too. 


Children must be over 12 months old to eat honey! The digestive systems of babies are not mature enough to process all the bacteria in honey, and it could poison them. 


Step 1


Sterilize your glass jars and lids by washing them with warm water and soap. Place them on a roasting pan while still wet. Put them in a 320 degrees Fahrenheit (160 degree Celsius) oven for 15 minutes. 2. 



Step 2


Pour some honey in each jar through the funnel and close the lid tightly. 3. 



Step 3


Design your own small greeting card. You can draw bees, flowers, or anything else that you imagine. 



Step 4


You can have fun writing “honey” on your cards in Hebrew:      דבש



Step 5


Punch a hole in your card.



Step 6


Top the lid of your jars with a square of fabric.



Step 7


Thread the ribbon through the hole in the card.



Step 8


Tie the ribbon to the rim of the lid of each jar over the fabric and honey dipper, securing it in place.